This year’s hottest destination? Portugal, says “Boston Globe”

Portugal’s attractiveness reached the other side of the Atlantic. The Boston Globe emphasises how a small country like Portugal has a varied range of offerings, “good food, rich history, great views and temperate climate”.

A couple stands while looking at the city of Lisbon
Lisbon

 

Lisbon is described as a city that “looks less like a national capital than an unusually large Mediterranean village”, where one can still witness people drying their clothes out in their windows and merchants drying their fish in the sun. The article points out places like Rossio square with its “majestic fountains”, the Commercial Square (Praça do Comércio, in Portuguese) representing the historic connection to the sea, the nightlife at Cais do Sodré, the street art booming throughout the city, Belém and its famous pastries.

Porto downtown

300km north, the city of Porto is pictured as “handsome and elegant”, with granite structures “packed on the hilly landscape and covered with colorful tiles”. The D. Luis Bridge, resembling the Eiffel tower architecture, the beautiful tiles of S. Bento train station, right in the heart of Porto, the Harry Potter inspiring bookstore Lello and McDonald’s – yes, McDonald’s – in Porto downtown are some the must-sees mentioned.

Between the days spent in Lisbon and Porto, the article recommends a pit stop in Óbidos, “a picturesque walled town with winding streets” and Sintra, the Unesco World Heritage Site, with the colorful and unique Pena Palace deserving all the attention, though Sintra has much more too offer and definitely worth the visit.

This is not the first time that Portugal gets compliments from the other side of the Atlantic north. A few examples: New-York based magazine “Travel + Leisure” chose Portugal as 2016 “destination of the year”; US News featured Lisbon as a perfect place for retirement; Financial Advisor Magazine also made Portugal a top choice to retire abroad.

March 24th: World Tuberculosis Day

World Tuberculosis day aims to raise awareness to the epidemic of tuberculosis, a disease that in 2015 affected more than 10 millions people worldwide. The theme for this year is “Unite to End TB”.

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection that affects mostly the lungs, though it is possible to affect other parts of the body. While it is considered a serious condition, it can be treated with antibiotics. This date commemorates the day, back in 1882, when Dr. Robert Koch announced the discovery of the virus that causes tuberculosis.

According to the WHO, tuberculosis is often overlooked because is hard to be diagnosed. Symptoms can include cough that lasts longer than 3 weeks (with phlegm that can have blood), weight loss, night sweats, fever, fatigue and loss of appetite.

TB occurs in every part of the world but the majority of cases are concentrated in Asia (61%) and Africa (26%). In countries with a few registered cases, TB affects mostly vulnerable individuals in social risk, like people with alcohol and drug problems or homeless people. TB affects particularly people who are infected with the HIV virus, as both infections speed up each other’s progression.

As in most health conditions, an early and proper diagnosis is the key to a better, faster recovery. Delaying treatment can lead to long-term health issues.

Source: WHO, CDC, StopTB, NHS

 

Parkinson’s: Rehabilitation and Learning Camp in Portugal

“You need motivation, I think that’s what the staff here are very good at, they are very good at motivating you without making you feel like it’s a bootcamp.”

We have already talked about how exercise can be a boost for people living with Parkinson’s . Campus Neurológico Sénior (CNS), in Portugal, offers a multi-strategy rehabilitation program for Parkinsons Disease patients and caregivers.  To learn more about what this program can offer, watch the video of Mary Deane, a Parkinson’s patient who stayed one week at the CNS.

The program involves professionals from different fields like physiotherapists, speech therapists, nutritionists and neuropsychologists. During the stay at the CNS, patients and caregivers do multiple physical activities such as boxe and dance adapted to Parkinson’s, nordic walking and hydrotherapy, among others, as well as exercises involving speech and balance. Besides the training component, there is also a strong educational side to help Parkinson’s patients and caregivers to cope better with the condition.

This program is coordinated by Professor Joaquim Ferreira, chair of the European section of the Movement Disorder Society. To learn more visit: www.medicalport.org/parkinsons